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It’s October, and Halloween just a few days away.  Appropriately, Monique has some very creepy vintage art prints by Edmund Sullivan.  A versatile artist born in 1869, E. J. Sullivan has a distinct knack for grotesque artwork.Rather than follow his father’s footsteps as a respected artist, Edmund focused on graphic design and, lucky for us, book illustration.  With that early direction, I wouldn’t be talking about him now.  :^)

Much to my surprise, one of his illustrated books is The Compleat Angler.  I say surprise, because I’ve owned this book… twice.  The first time was a gift while I was sick in the hospital, and I deeply enjoyed it.  It was damaged in a move, and later replaced.  I’ve treasured it greatly over the years, not the least for it’s illustrations.  Comes as a surprise to find a book I’ve enjoyed was drawn by one of Monique’s vintage artists.
This time around, she’s got original art from The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.  I won’t pretend to have read this one.  It’s not exactly in my circle of beloved books.  Took a look at Wiki, and apparently the book represents many things to many people, depending greatly on which translation you’re reading.  The gist is that it’s a collection of persian poems by Omar Kayyam.
What I know is the art is appropriately ‘interesting’.  Wiki calls the style “grotesque”, which makes sense, but going by the young folk these days, I think “Goth” might be a better description.It’s kind of cool how old vintage art is still relevant to modern (and younger) culture.  Today, a winged skeleton ‘Angel of Death’ is just as likely to be seen on a t-shirt as in a book of vintage art.  In this one, the Angel of Death is handing a woman an oversized mug filled to the brim and dripping.  Given the context, it’s probably blood.  And if she drinks from it?  Death, I expect.I like that Death is sporting a Halo.  To see a winged skeleton is rare enough, one with a halo is taking things ‘to the next level’.